Studies

For a new installation I’m making studies using small objects like the ones described in this post.┬áThe placement and the making of the combinations is mainly an intuitive act. Making these studies on the other hand gives me an idea of which path to take in making the objects for it.

study for an installation | ceramics, glaze, wax

study for an installation | ceramics, glass, wax

study for an installation | ceramics, glaze

study for an installation | wax

Glaze colour tests

Yesterday new glaze colour tests came out of the kiln. After the first test round a few days before my aim was to make more subtle blue, pink and yellow. Besides that I have tested my base glazes on other types of clay, and I see now that the satin glaze turns glossy sometimes.

Some vitreous engobe tests have also been fired, the colours are very heavy, so I think I should start colouring those with amounts normal for glazes and not for engobes.

Here are some pictures of the results:

Pink glazes made with stains.

Pink glazes made with stains.

In the middle two round test tiles, the right one is a recipe with a Cr-Sn pink stain, the left with a Mn pink stain. The Cr-Sn pink stain develops a darker pink with smaller amounts. With rutile the pink is less bright but it produces a more variegated glaze.
I have tried to make a Cr-Sn red/pink in the same base glaze, but it didn’t work. I assume it is because off the ratio CaO-Boron (too much Boron).

Yellow glaze made with a small amount of red FeO.

Yellow glaze made with a small amount of red FeO.

I want to try to make the yellow brighter by adding some yellow stain, but maybe I should try the glaze on a larger surface first.

Blue glaze made with small amounts of a turquoise stain and rutile.

Blue glaze made with small amounts of a turquoise stain and rutile.

Turquoise glaze on red throwing clay.

Blue glaze on red throwing clay.

This test round produced more subtle blue glazes, I’m really happy with these colours. Although the satin glaze had a little more stain, its colour is still fainter.
These glazes were coloured with a turquoise stain and rutile. Previous I tried making blue with CoO but this produced a lavender coloured glaze.

Turquoise made with CuO and turquoise made with a stain.

Turquoise made with CuO and turquoise made with a stain.

The first glaze is made with CuO, SnO and ZnO and produced an almost stain-like turquoise, it’s even stronger than the colour the fourth glaze has which was coloured with a turquoise stain.

Glazes en engobes

You might have noticed that my work isn’t glazed. I prefer a non-glazed surface on my ceramic work and mostly use terra sigillata and engobes. But for ware to be functional it needs to be glazed. Since I’m sort of addicted to testing, I enjoy the search for a foodsafe base-glaze.

Since a few months I’m working from time to time on developing my own base glaze and a base engobe. At this point it seems I’m on the right track. I still have to do some testing, but the results look promising.

I started searching these bases for the casting slip K150 from Vingerling, a commonly used slip here in The Netherlands and Belgium. I’m looking for a glossy, transparent, foodsafe base glaze that I can change to be matte and opaque, has a good suspension, responds well to colours and shows the engobe decorations underneath clearly.

The engobes should both fit well on leather hard and bisque fired clay, match with the base glaze, respond well to colours and after screen printing transfer easily to the clay.

In my next posts I’ll write about this search, and I hope it will help other people that are starting a similar search to conquer the glaze dragon.